MSP in practice

Ethiopia is a well-known country for many coffee fans. Arabica beans grow in the fertile highland regions of the country. However, sustainability in coffee cultivation and consumption requires a comprehensive approach, as demonstrated by the Initiative for Sustainable Agricultural Supply Chains (INA) with its multi-stakeholder approach. 

Despite having very good conditions for coffee cultivation, Ethiopia faces a variety of challenges affecting the sustainability of its coffee production and supply chain. The complex challenges along the coffee supply chain have diverse causes, ranging from local to global factors, including the impact of climate change and addressing socio-economic inequalities. 

Given these challenges, it is clear how important it is for different actors to work together to build sustainable coffee supply chains. One initiative that contributes to a sustainable coffee supply chain is the Initiative for Sustainable Agricultural Supply Chains (INA). It provides a platform for stakeholders from the private sector, civil society and politics. Its aim is to promote sustainability through the exchange and dissemination of knowledge. In order to promote living incomes, deforestation-free supply chains and digitalization, the INA serves as an open learning platform and field of experimentation for all stakeholders involved, with the aim of jointly improving the living conditions of smallholder farmers through comprehensive solutions.  

The Project Sustainability and Value Added in Agricultural Supply Chains in Ethiopia (SUVASE) project became central to INA’s work in Ethiopia. It involves working with coffee cooperatives and growers to promote sustainable farming methods, improve quality and facilitate access to international markets. Through partnerships with global companies and the introduction of internationally recognized certifications, the project supports producers in generating higher revenues and helps to reduce deforestation. INA also works with AgriChain to ensure due diligence in supply chains in line with EU regulations. AgriChain also campaigns for gender equality in Ethiopia and combats child labor in the coffee sector.

The Coffee Public-Private Task Force (CPPTF) also focuses on establishing and promoting dialog between different stakeholders in order to enable sustainable coffee production. It has been supported by INA on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) since 2019: The CPPTF aims to bring the coffee industry and governments together in a global partnership. Its goal is a sustainable global coffee cultivation on local and global level that ensures a sustainable standard of living.

Sustainable coffee production and fair supply chains need collaborative approaches. It is therefore an important signal that the EU supply chain law was recently confirmed and that a sufficient majority of EU-countries support the law to protect human rights and due diligence.

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